If you’re sat on the train on the commute to work reading this blog, or if you’re in the office, have a look around you. All of your colleagues will be wearing some form of uniform, whether it’s smart business attire, whether it’s a name badge, or whether it’s a lanyard. There will be something that brings your business or your company culture together and means that you can be distinguished as being part of the crowd. Lanyards have become such a common workplace uniform, but have you ever stopped to wonder why this is and how it came about?

A brief history:

In January 1991, compulsory lanyards were brought into the BBC Broadcasting House, as a security measure. The idea behind this was for security reasons and exclusivity, any employee of the BBC would have to show their ID and lanyard to be granted entrance into the building. There were so many different members of staff coming and going from the BBC during the Gulf War, recording reels and reels of radio edits and information, that it came to a point where there needed to be order and semblance in the organisation.

Over the years, lanyards have developed into a symbol of status and company branding. Whether this is a journalist in a war zone, a doctor in a hospital or a charity worker, a lanyard allows you to clearly see that a person belongs to an organisation or to a company.  

Company branding:

Branding is an integral part of any business. If you want somebody to know who you are and what you are about, then you need to have a company branding strategy in place. If you want to build brand awareness, then you should seek to make a good impression on your potential customers and clients. There are various different techniques that you can adopt in order to find the best combination for yourself and your business. Lanyards are symbolic of good business branding, as those who already know you will recognise your business from the branded lanyards your employees wear, but the can also be used as the spark that will ignite your brand awareness.

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